Posts tagged “iRacing

Who’s better – F1 drivers or Sprint Cup Drivers?

We are about to release the Williams FW31 at iRacing.com so I thought now would be a good time to revisit the age old question. . . . . Who’s better – F1 drivers or Sprint Cup Drivers?

Is Jimmie Johnson, the four time reigning champion in NASCAR’s highest level series, better than Lewis Hamilton, F1 star and past champion? What is more difficult, driving a 3,450 lbs brawny stock car shaped like a brick with a gigantic V8 under the hood or driving a sculpted 620 kg open wheel car with a 2.4liter V8 that revs to 18,000 rpm?

Jimmie Johnson at NHMS in September 2010.

Sure there have been publicity stunts where drivers from each series swapped cars for a couple of laps, but they never really had enough time to get up to speed with the new cars. And what about the F1 drivers that moved to NASCAR like Juan Pablo Montoya? He was fairly successful in F1 when he ran in a top performing car but he has yet to see the same level of success in NASCAR as of yet. He also won a few races on oval tracks in Indy cars so he definitely gets the whole turning left thing. Does this mean that it takes more skill to race in NASCAR compared to F1? If that is the case how come the less successful NASCAR drivers aren’t jumping ship joining F1, surely they could win there if they are as talented as NASCAR commentators make them out to be.

Let’s face it, winning at these levels is hard to do. You really are racing the best of the best (minus the back markers who seem to buy their way into the series). You need skill, equipment, luck, as well as a team that can back you up. In NASCAR, where the cars are so similar between the teams, JJ clearly has the edge on everyone right now. No doubt about his skill as a driver, Hendrick cars are fast, he somehow misses the ‘big one’ more often than not and he has one of the smartest crew chiefs and most reliable teams in NASCAR. On the other hand, Formula one puts more emphasis on the equipment since each team build their own car from the ground up. To win, drivers still need skill, luck and a solid team, but there is not much a driver can do if the car he is driving is inferior to the rest of the field.

Hamilton, Alonso and Button in Montreal June 2010

In F1, qualifying is crucial. It is very hard to pass due to current car regulations, although it is getting better, so drivers need to be able to turn that ‘golden lap’ when the pressure is on. In NASCAR, qualifying rarely selects the race winner – it is basically used to sell more tickets and ads on TV. Qualifying only matters for the few that might not make the field, and several of these guys don’t even plan to race the entire distance (maybe that is where Nick Wirth got the idea to design the Virgin Racing F1 cars with fuel tanks too small to complete a race). One might even argue that in order to win a NASCAR Sprint Cup race you first need to just survive the 300-400 laps before the final caution, and then race to the finish. Does merely surviving 480 miles at Daytona so you can race the final 15 minutes make you a more skilled driver than someone who has to race all out for an entire Grand Prix?

So where does this leave us? NASCAR or F1? Remember, so far Jimmie Johnson won all of his championships without ever winning a race in which he had to turn right. I suspect we’ll never know for sure and we certainly won’t all agree who is better. My opinion is that F1 drivers are more skilled behind the wheel – they drive their cars on the edge at ten-tenths all of the time, race in variable conditions including rain and have so much less room for error with the fragile carbon fiber suspensions.  NASCAR drivers, well none of that applies.

Who thinks I’m wrong? Oh and by the way, this is not a debate about which makes better racing for the fans, I am saving that one for another blog entry.

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It’s the most wonderful time of year

Living in the northeast US I am used to cold, snowy winters, I actually enjoy them. What I don’t like about winter is that it is the off-season of motorsports. Sure there is still some racing going on around the world but none of it is covered on US television so essentially motorsports is on winter break. Now winter is still here but it is the end of January which means racing is about to start again!

Anything is possible at this point in the season. Whomever you root for – the championship is still a possibility. New rules and new teams add questions and intrigue. How will the new COT spoiler work, who will be behind the wheel when USF1 debuts their cars? How will Danica fair in a stock car and will she win the Indy 500? The questions only increase the anticipation. The racing gods have yet to bestow any victories or take away any dreams. It really is the best time of year for race fans.

This year I am even more excited about the start of the racing season than usual. So much is going on at iRacing – the official NASCAR series are about to start, we just signed a deal with Williams F1 to bring the FW32 to the sim, the iRacing Rolex 2.4 is this weekend, we have partnered with the #99 Gainsco car for the Rolex 24 (you’ll see our logo on the rear wing) and we sponsored Andrew Caddell’s Mustang in the Continental Challenge race at Daytona. As a diehard motorsports fan I have always anticipated this time of year, but always as a fan. Now I actually feel as if I am part of the world wide racing community.

This weekend’s iRacing Rolex 2.4 is sure to be a great event; unfortunately I’ll miss it as I will be in Daytona for the Rolex 24. I’ll be tweeting live updates from the track and garages though. Keep tabs on the iRacing cars by following iRacing on Twitter and becoming a fan on Facebook. I ‘m disappointed to miss the iRacing Rolex 2.4 but thrilled to be part of the official opening of the 2010 racing season.

What has you most energized about the upcoming season? NASCAR, F1, sports cars, iRacing? Will the drama in the paddock be more interesting than the battles on the track? Let me know what excites you about 2010 motorsports.

iRacers to watch at the Rolex 24:
Alex Gurney #99 Gainsco Riley DP
Justin Wilson #01 BMW Riley DP
AJ Allmendinger #6 Ford Riley DP
Colin Braun #75 Ford Lola DP
Derek Johnston #77 Ford Dallara
Jordan Taylor #30 Mazda RX8
Spencer Pumpelly #71 Porsche GT3

Continental Challenge
Barry Waddell #99 BMW M3
Andrew Caddell #59 Ford Mustang
Trevor Hopwood #12 Kia Forte Coupe
Adam Burrows #12 Kia Forte Coupe
Josh Hurley #181 VW GTI


Hex-a-what?

The worlds of motorsport, both real world and online, are continuing to blend into one. I had the opportunity to drive the Cruden Hexatech simulator this past week at the Performance Racing industry show (PRI) in Orlando, FL and it is really pretty remarkable. Incredibly smooth motion including the ability to simulate yaw which I have not found in any of the other motion platforms I have driven. Being able to feel the back end of the car you are driving move around in a corner is incredibly important when it comes to replicating a real life driving experience.

The 6-axis Cruden Simulator

Race drivers who wish to sharpen their driving skills would no doubt find the simulator useful, albeit a bit pricey – $300K. The average sim racer will likely find it impractical in terms of size and price but if given the opportunity I do recommend you give the Cruden a test drive.

Now if only they had been running iRacing software I think the experience would have nearly perfect! iRacing’s track modeling and car physics are more precise than what I drove on the Cruden and would add a lot to the experience.  Yes, I am a bit biased as I work for iRacing but there really is no equal to laser scanned tracks with millimeter accuracy.

Combining multi axis motion with incredibly accurate track and car models will continue to grow as a way for racers to practice and hone their skills. Testing and training on a simulator is cheaper, safer and less time consuming than going to the track and in this economy what team wouldn’t want that.